Camilla Hinde

Biography
Camilla Hinde received her PhD from Cambridge University in 2005, which investigated reproductive strategies in great tits. She then held a post-doc with Rebecca Kilner, investigating maternal effects in canaries (Cambridge, 2004-2007), before continuing to work with great tits as a Junior Research Fellow (Newnham College, Cambridge, 2007-2010). She then spent two years working with Prof. Ben Sheldon as a senior post-doc, investigating social networks in great tits. She joined the Behavioural Ecology group at Wageningen in July 2012 as an Assistant Professor, and was promoted to Associate Professor in July 2015.

Research interests
•Family conflicts
•Maternal effects
•Negotiation
•Sexual conflict
•Social networks

Project overview
My research primarily uses field experiments to investigate the evolution of behaviour and social interactions in birds. My work has primarily focused on interactions during pair formation and breeding, and the fitness consequences of these interactions.

Research group
Post-doc - Shana Caro - Environmental effects on parental strategy
Post-doc – James Savage – Cooperation in parental care in great tits
PhD: Lies Zandberg – Individual differences in mate choice and reproductive investment in great tits.
PhD: Davide Baldan - Dynamics of parental care. Principal Investigator is Kate Lessells
Masters students - current team studying great tit song, provisioning strategies and chick begging.

How is phenotypic variation in great tits (Parus major) maintained by sexual selection? This exciting project is funded by a Marie Curie Career Integration grant. This project is led by Lies Zandberg (PhD student) and is a collaboration with Kees van Oers (Netherlands Institute for Ecology). See link “Sexual Selection project”

See link “Sexual Selection project”

Maternal effects prehatching
My post-doc with Dr. Rebecca Kilner investigated how mothers can transfer information of environmental quality to their chicks via egg hormones. We showed that chicks benefitted from responding to these prenatal signals.

Signals of quality and prehatching investment
Partners raising a family must each decide how much to invest in their shared offspring. My work on great tits has shown how females vary egg investment in response to male plumage characters, as well as how a females’ own plumage advertises her maternal investment.

Negotiation and posthatching investment
Each parent would benefit if the other did more of the work, so how do parents with different optima collaborate to raise a family? I have shown that great tit parents respond directly to each others work rates, and that the direction of response can vary. In collaboration with Dr. Rufus Johnstone and Dr. Andrea Manica, I am investigating the dynamics of reciprocal interactions during chick feeding, and how these relationships benefit chicks.

Social Networks
My work with great tit social networks is in collaboration with Prof. Ben Sheldon, University of Oxford. This is a large scale project which involves tracking the associations between birds in winter flocks. My particular interest is to understand individual differences in social behaviour, as well as how building relationships over winter are related to reproductive success in the Spring.

How is phenotypic variation in great tits (Parus major) maintained by sexual selection?
This exciting project is funded by a Marie Curie Career Integration grant. This project is led by Lies Zandberg (PhD student) and is a collaboration with Kees van Oers (Netherlands Institute for Ecology).
See link “Sexual Selection project”

Other