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Development of a Dutch Diet History Questionnaire to assess the dietary intake of low SES pregnant women

Beulen, Y.H.; Borgonjen-van den Berg, Karin; Wagemakers, A.; Vries, J.H.M. de

Summary

Development of a Dutch Diet History Questionnaire to assess the dietary intake of low SES pregnant women Y.H. Beulen1,2, K. Borgonjen-van den Berg1, A. Wagemakers2, J.H.M. de Vries11Division of Human Nutrition and Health, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands2 Health and Society, Social Sciences Group, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, The NetherlandsPresenting author: Yvette BeulenBackground: Pregnant women often fail to meet dietary requirements, especially in low socioeconomic status (SES) populations. To gain insight into the usual dietary intake of low SES pregnant women in the Netherlands, we developed a Dutch Diet History Questionnaire (DDHQ). The DDHQ was generated to combine the open character of a Diet History interview with the standardization of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ).Methods: The format of the questions was based on that of an existing FFQ. A meal-based structure was created and open questions on missing foods and context were added. Food items and portion sizes were adjusted to the target population by analysing dietary data of both pregnant women and women of reproductive age, to theoretically cover at least 95% of the intake. The Dutch FFQ tool was used to generate the computer-based DDHQ, automatically calculating energy and nutrient intakes using the Dutch Food Composition Database. A small-scale pilot study (n=7) was conducted to test the face validity and acceptability of the DDHQ in the target group.Results: The result is a 185-item meal-based questionnaire with a one month reference period, administered by trained dietitians in interviews conducted at the participant’s home (if possible). The pilot study showed that the method was comprehensible and feasible, although the length of the questionnaire was considered a drawback by some participants. The DDHQ interviews have been found to take 1.5 up to 3 hours, which is similar to the time needed for a diet history interview.Discussion: We have developed a method that is less costly and time consuming than a full Diet History method and more comprehensive than an FFQ. Although the FFQ that served as a basis was validated, the current method has not been validated yet in the target population. We do expect that by adjusting the food list to the target group, adding open questions and administration by trained dietitians, we cover the complete (contextual) dietary intake of low SES pregnant women.Key words: dietary assessment; Diet History Questionnaire; pregnancy; interviewer-administration; low socioeconomic status