Dies Natalis: Towards a global one health

On March 9th 2017, Wageningen University & Research will celebrate its 99th Dies Natalis. The celebration will take place on Wageningen Campus, Orion building, Bronland 1, 6708 WH Wageningen, and is scheduled to start at 15.30 hr. The celebration is preceded by a symposium scheduled to begin at 10.00 hr on campus. More information on the programme and speakers will be posted as it becomes available.

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Celebration

Programme official celebration
15:30 Opening
Professor dr. Arthur P.J. Mol – Rector Magnificus Wageningen University
Professor Sir Roy M Anderson FRS FMedSci, Imperial College London
Interlude
Response by three Wageningen University & Research scientists: Dr Alexandra Hiscox, Ewaldus Wera MSc and Dr Marjon de Vos
Presentation of the University Fund Wageningen Research Award
Roundup by Prof. dr. Arthur P.J. Mol
17:00 Reception

Symposium

Programme Dies Natalis Symposium
10.00 Registration
10.30 Richard Visser - Dean of Research, Wageningen University & Research
Introduction NCOH themes and PhD pitch sessions - PhD students will present their research related to the theme of the dies
12.00 - 13.00 Lunch
13.00 Introduction NCOH themes and PhD pitch sessions - PhD students will present their research related to the theme of the dies
UFW-KLV Thesis Award ceremony
14.30 End of programme

Location

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Photos and videos of the Dies Natalis 2017

Dies Natalis 2017 photos and videos

About the theme of Dies Natalis 2017

The health of people, animals, and their environments are closely connected: think of zoonosis, plant pests or other vector borne diseases. Understanding these interactions is crucial to safeguard the health of people everywhere on the planet. Besides these communicable diseases, a significant impact on public health is caused by global challenges, such as malnutrition, urbanisation and climate change. A Global One Health approach studies the effects created by this double burden and formulates strategies to control, mitigate and prevent them.

More information about Towards a global one health