An oyster reef to protect the coast, mangroves or willows in front of the dyke. Slowly but surely, a new insight is gaining ground: hard civil engineering interventions by themselves are not a panacea. Nature seems willing to help us keep the upper hand over the advancing waves and rising sea levels and provides us with new sources of food and income.(© Christiaan van Sluis)
An oyster reef to protect the coast, mangroves or willows in front of the dyke. Slowly but surely, a new insight is gaining ground: hard civil engineering interventions by themselves are not a panacea. Nature seems willing to help us keep the upper hand over the advancing waves and rising sea levels and provides us with new sources of food and income.(© Christiaan van Sluis)
Wageningen Marine Research regularly undertakes expeditions in the Arctic, based at the arctic station in Ny-Ålesund on Svalbard. In 2016, the researchers kept a blog about their work and their encounters with, among others, John Kerry and polar bears.
Wageningen Marine Research regularly undertakes expeditions in the Arctic, based at the arctic station in Ny-Ålesund on Svalbard. In 2016, the researchers kept a blog about their work and their encounters with, among others, John Kerry and polar bears.
Researchers of Wageningen Marine Research go on expeditions and conduct annual surveys at sea: in the North Sea, but also in the Caribbean, the Arctic and Antarctica. During these trips, the researchers post updates in a blog, so you can follow their findings.
Researchers of Wageningen Marine Research go on expeditions and conduct annual surveys at sea: in the North Sea, but also in the Caribbean, the Arctic and Antarctica. During these trips, the researchers post updates in a blog, so you can follow their findings.