Healthy nutrition, healthy life

WUR bracht in kaart op welke punten kan worden ingegrepen om epidemieën in de toekomst te voorkomen.

Slowing down Q-fever and Lyme

In infectious diseases such as Q-fever and Lyme disease, animals are the source for infection. Outbreaks cannot be prevented, but their reach and effect can be mitigated.

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Onderzoekers van WUR screenen poep van landbouwhuisdieren om antibioticaresistentie in kaart te brengen.

Less resistance to antibiotics in livestock farming

Bacteria that are irresponsive to antibiotics pose a threat to public health. WUR studies the relationship between antibiotics and resistant bacteria in livestock farming.

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Wageningse onderzoekers helpen fabrikanten om voedingsmiddelen gezonder te maken én lekker te houden.

Tasty food with less sugar

Making foodstuffs healthier while retaining their flavour is not always easy. Collaboration to create products with healthier properties is essential to a healthier society.

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Better welfare for pigs

Pigs display less biting behaviour when living a comfortable, social, energetic life. Wageningen University & Research expertise contributes to animal-friendly sties and other welfare-enhancing concepts.

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Better for the animals, better for the environment

Consumers increasingly value the environment and animal welfare in the keeping of animals. But what exactly does this mean? Wageningen University & Research experts study this and translate their knowledge into innovative concepts for barns and animal feed.

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Sustainability criteria in trade agreements

Food security depends in large part on transparent agreements on sustainability in food production. Wageningen University & Research (WUR) experts study how these aspects may be included in international trade agreements.

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Tailored nutrition advice thanks to digital twin

Wageningen scientists use a digital twin to predict how people will respond to meals. Not everyone responds in the same way to a meal rich in sugar or fat—the ultimate goal: a digitally generated tailored diet recommendation.

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One click to identify cocaine

One simple click to determine whether a street sample contains cocaine. The NIR application developed by Wageningen scientists in collaboration with government institutes and other researchers makes this possible. The first step towards a scanner application that also detects other frequently used drugs.

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An alternative to animal testing

The Dutch government aims to acquire a leading position in animal test-free innovations by 2025. Wageningen University & Research scientists are developing various alternatives to animal testing in food safety.

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