Course

Academic Publication and Presentation in the Social Sciences - 4 ECTS

This course offers advanced instruction in the skills needed to successfully write and present an academic research paper, as well as in professionalization for an academic career more generally. Lessons will address the various stages of paper writing (outlines, abstracts, literature reviews, overall structure, writing style and strategies, submission for publication), conversion of papers into conference presentations; and understanding the academic career and job market. This course will focus specifically on writing in the social sciences and humanities, which have their particular structures and expectations commonly distinct from most natural science fields.

Organised by Wageningen School of Social Sciences (WASS)
Date

ma 18 februari 2019 until do 14 maart 2019

Duration Registration deadline: Friday 4 February 2019
Venue Leeuwenborch, building number 201
Hollandseweg 1
201
6706 KN Wageningen
0317-483639

Programme

Session 1: Monday 18 February (13:00-16:00): Understanding the Publishing Landscape

This session introduces the course and provides an overview of the academic publishing landscapes and different strategies for engaging with it.

Readings:

Loehle, Craig. 1990. A Guide to Increased Creativity in Research--Inspiration or Perspiration? Bioscience (40)2: 123-129.

Dunleavy, Patrick. (2003) “Publishing your Research. Ch.9 in Authoring a PhD: How to plan, draft, write and finish a doctoral thesis or dissertation. New York: Palgrave Macmillan

Session 2: Thursday 21 February (13:00-16:00): The Art of the Abstract

Writing a good abstract for an article or conference presentation is an important yet underappreciated academic skill. In this session we’ll discuss techniques for how to do this well.

Readings:

Sword, Helen. (2010) “The Big Picture.” Ch. 13 in Stylish Academic Writing. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Session 3: Monday 25 February (13:00-16:00): The Literature Review

A good literature review demonstrates your command of the field while also establishing the originality and importance of your own analysis. Hence it is a key component of a good article and we will discuss how to do it well.

Readings:

Taylor, Dena. nd. “The Literature Review: A Few tips on Conducting It.” University of Toronto. Http://www.utoronto.ca/writing/

Becker, Howard S. 2008. “Terrorized by the Literature.” Pp. 136-149 in Writing for Social Scientists: How to Start and Finish Your Thesis, Book, or Article. 2nd Edition. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Optional:

Bernard, H. Russell. 2004. “The Literature Search.” Pp. 96-108 in Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches. 4th Edition. New York: Altamira Press.

Session 4: Thursday 28 February (13:00-16:00): Outlining your Article/Dissertation (Optional)

This session will address how to create a detailed outline to guide the writing process of an article as a component of an overall dissertation or thesis project.

Readings:

Dunleavy, Patrick. (2003) “Planning an Integrated Thesis” and “Organizing a Chapter or Paper.” Chs. 3 & 4 in Authoring a PhD: How to plan, draft, write and finish a doctoral thesis or dissertation. New York: Palgrave Macmillan

Optional:

Sword, Helen. (2010) “Structural Designs. ”Ch. 11 in Stylish Academic Writing. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Session 5: Monday 4 March (13:00-16:00): Writing I; Strategy

In this session we will delve into the mechanics of the writing process itself, discussing how to organizing your writing and how to keep yourself motivated and on track as you develop it.

Readings:

Becker, Howard S. 2008. “One Right Way.” Pp. 43-67 in Writing for Social Scientists: How to Start and Finish Your Thesis, Book, or Article. 2nd Edition.  Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Dunleavy, Patrick. (2003) “Developing your Text and Managing the Writing Process.” Ch. 6 in Authoring a PhD: How to plan, draft, write and finish a doctoral thesis or dissertation. New York: Palgrave Macmillan

Optional:

Emerson, Robert, Fretz, Rachel & Shaw, Linda (2005) Chapter Four: Writing Up Fieldnotes II: Scenes on the Page. Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes. Chicago & London: The University of Chicago Press. Pp. 66-107.

Session 6: Thursday 7 March (13:00-16:00): Writing II; Execution

This session continues the discussion started in the previous by discussing how to write in a compelling and engaging manner and avoid common pitfalls including reliance on  unnecessary jargon.

Readings:

Sword, Helen. (2010) “Smart Sentences” and “Show and Tell” and “The Creative Touch. ”Chs. 5,9, and 14 in Stylish Academic Writing. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Optional:

Becker, Howard S. 2008. “Freshman English for Graduate Students” and “Persona and Authority.” Pp. 1-25 and 26-42 in Writing for Social Scientists: How to Start and Finish Your Thesis, Book, or Article. 2nd Edition. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Pollock, T. G., & Bono, J. E. (2013). Being Scheherazade: The importance of storytelling in academic writing. Academy of Management Journal56(3), 629-634.

Orwell, George. 1946. “Politics and the English Language.” Reprint.

Coordinator Bio

Robert Fletcher is Associate Professor in the Sociology of Development and Change (SDC) group at WUR. He is the author of more than 60 articles and book chapters as well as a monograph, Romancing the Wild: Cultural Dimensions of Ecotourism (Duke U Press, 2014). He is co-editor-in-chief of Geoforum and associate editor of Conservation & Society and regularly reviews article manuscripts for more than 50 other journals. He has also co-edited two collections of essays, NatureTM Inc.: Environmental Conservation in the Neoliberal Age (U of Arizona Press, 2014) and Lessons from the Ecolaboratory: Negotiating Environment and Development in Costa Rica (U of Arizona Press, forthcoming).

General Resources:

Becker, Howard S. (2008) Writing for Social Scientists: How to Start and Finish Your Thesis, Book, or Article. Chicago. IL: University of Chicago Press.

Dunleavy, Patrick. (2003) Authoring a PhD: How to plan, draft, write and finish a doctoral thesis or dissertation. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Van Maanen, J. (2011). Tales of the field: On writing ethnography. University of Chicago Press.

Sword, Helen. (2010) Stylish Academic Writing. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Germano, William. (2016). Getting It Published. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. 

Narayan, Kirin. (2012). Alive in the writing: Crafting ethnography in the company of Chekhov. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Peters, Kimberley. 2017. Your Human Geography Dissertation: Designing, Doing, Delivering. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Schedule

Session 1 18-2-2019 13:00-16:00
Session 2 21-2-2018 13:00-16:00
Session 3 25-2-2019 13:00-16:00
Session 4 28-2-2019 13:00-16:00
Session 5 04-3-2019 13:00-16:00
Session 6 07-3-2019 13:00-16:00
Session 7 11-3-2019 13:00-16:00
Session 8 14-3-2019 13:00-16:00

Learning outcomes

After successful completion of this course, participants are expected to be able to:

1.     Develop a quality research paper for academic peer review

2.     Deliver a research paper in conference presentation format

3.     Demonstrate command of the academic publishing landscape

Assessment

Final paper – submission of publication quality research paper (or exemplary proposal). This will be sent to colleagues for professional peer review.                 

                

Target group and min/max number of participants

This course is intended for PhD candidates and advanced research master students; 10 min/25 max participants

Assumed prior knowledge

Msc. Social science; advanced qualitative research methods; having completed a substantial research period and ready to write up results

Course fee 

WASS, PE&RC and WIMEK/SENSE PhDs with TSP € 300
a) All other PhD candidates b) Postdocs and staff of the above mentioned Graduate Schools € 600
All others € 900

NB: for some courses, PhD candidates from other WUR graduate schools with a TSP are also entitled to a reduced fee. Please consult your Education/PhD Programme Coordinator for more information

Cancellation conditions:

The participants can cancel their registration free of charge 1 month before the course starts. A cancellation fee of 100% applies if a participant cancels his/her registration less than 1 month prior to the start of the course.

The organisers have the right to cancel the course no later than one month before the planned course start date in the case that the number of registrations does not reach the minimum.

The participants will be notified of any changes at their e-mail addresses.