Seminar

SDC SEMINAR Wounded landscapes: understanding nature-society relations in conflict-affected areas in times of climate change, by Esther Marijnen

In this seminar Esther Marijnen describes her VENI proposal. By studying ‘wounded landscapes’ on their own terms, in a variety of settings, the project aims to question various colonial durabilities in how landscapes are understood, represented and protected. As a result the project will contribute to our knowledge about how nature is, and can be, protected in conflict-affected areas in times of climate change.

Organised by Sociology of Development and Change
Date

Tue 26 November 2019 12:30 to 13:30

Venue Leeuwenborch, building number 201
Hollandseweg 1
201
6706 KN Wageningen
0317-483639
Room C62
Price description Free for all

Wounded landscapes: understanding nature-society relations in conflict-affected areas in times of climate change

Conservationists increasingly venture into war zones, and other areas affected by protracted violent conflict, to halt the destruction of biodiversity and to uphold the integrity of protected areas. Yet this research project questions if these interventions are based on a thorough understanding of the specifics of nature-society relations during, or in the aftermath of, violent conflict.

Existing literature mainly focusses on how nature is destroyed, or used as a resource bank, by warring parties. People in war zones, specifically refugees, are considered as having a negative relationship with their environment. This is problematic, since people have multifaceted relations with nature both during and in the aftermath of war (some people also find refuge in forests for example).

Moreover, scant attention is paid on how their relationship with the environment is not only influenced by violent conflict, but also by the consequences of climate change. Both dynamics become embedded within the landscapes, resulting in what I call ‘wounded landscapes’. By studying ‘wounded landscapes’ on their own terms, in a variety of settings, the project aims to question various colonial durabilities in how landscapes are understood, represented and protected. As a result, the project will contribute to our knowledge about how nature is, and can be, protected in conflict-affected areas in times of climate change.