KV 1509-039 CHIC, Chrysanthemum Haploid Induction through Chromosome elimination

Project

KV 1509-039 CHIC, Chrysanthemum Haploid Induction through Chromosome elimination

Homozygous lines are very important in plant breeding, e.g. to monitor the effect of recessive genes or to produce stably identical F1 hybrids. When inbreeding does not provide the answer or is simply not possible the induction of haploids followed by doubling (induced or spontaneous) will lead to the desired homozygosity. In diploids this will result in homozygous di(ha)ploids and in polyploids it will lead to a reduction of heterozygosity. The latter can be of great help in assembly after genome sequencing and in preparing genetic maps useful in marker assisted breeding. Haploid induction by tissue culture techniques such as anther or ovule culture or by microspore embryogenesis is limited to a small number of crops. Modifying the performance of the centromer-specific Histone3 protein, CENH3, is reported to lead to a so-called haploid inducer. Crossing with such an inducer plant will result in haploids carrying only the chromosomes of the wild-type parent. 

Homozygous lines are very important in plant breeding, e.g. to monitor the effect of recessive genes or to produce stably identical F1 hybrids. When inbreeding does not provide the answer or  is simply not possible, the induction of haploids followed by doubling (induced or spontaneous) will lead to the desired homozygosity. In diploids this will result in homozygous di(ha)ploids and in polyploids it will lead to a reduction of heterozygosity. The latter can be of great help in assembly after genome sequencing and in preparing genetic maps useful in marker assisted breeding. Haploid induction by tissue culture techniques such as anther or ovule culture or by microspore embryogenesis is limited to a small number of crops. Modifying the performance of the centromer-specific Histone3 protein, CENH3, is reported to lead to a so-called haploid inducer. Crossing with such an inducer plant will result in haploids carrying only the chromosomes of the wild-type parent. 

Publications