Lezing

Centre for Space, Place and Society: Distinguished Lecture

You are cordially invited to the Centre for Space, Place and Society Distinguished Annual Lecture, entitled:
Presence and Social Obligation: An Essay on the Share
by James Ferguson, Stanford University

Organisator Centre for Space, Place and Society (CSPS)
Datum

di 9 mei 2017 16:00 tot 18:00

Locatie Orion, building number 103
Bronland 1
103
6708 WH Wageningen
+31 (0) 317 48 87 77
Room C1032/C2030 (drinks&bites afterwards at café The Spot)
Zaal/kamer C1032/C2030

You are cordially invited to the Centre for Space, Place and Society Distinguished Lecture, entitled:               

Presence and Social Obligation: An Essay on the Share

by James Ferguson, Stanford University

In a recent book, I analyzed the figure of the share as a principle of distribution of social protection payments or “cash transfers” in the global South in general, and in southern Africa in particular.  Noting that today’s existing schemes of distribution are (like all “social” schemes before them) limited by principles of nation-state membership, I concluded with the suggestion that it may be possible to detect new logics of social obligation emerging that work not according to a logic of citizenship and national membership, but according to a principle that I called “presence”. This paper is an attempt to elaborate this conception, and to develop a more complete account of how such an understanding of presence might provide a basis both for an expanded sense of social obligation and for more inclusionary forms of politics.

Biography:

James Ferguson is the Susan S. and William H. Hindle Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, and Professor in the Department of Anthropology. His research has focused on southern Africa (especially Lesotho, Zambia, South Africa, and Namibia), and has engaged a broad range of theoretical and ethnographic issues. These include the politics of “development”, rural-urban migration, changing topographies of property and wealth, constructions of space and place, urban culture in mining towns, experiences of modernity, the spatialization of states, the place of “Africa” in a real and imagined world, and the theory and politics of ethnography. He is the author of several well-known books, including The Anti-Politics Machine: "Development," Depoliticization, and Bureaucratic Power in Lesotho and Give a Man A Fish: Reflections on the New Politics of Distribution. For more information on this annual lecture visit the CSPS website.

This annual lecture is open for all WUR employees, PhD's and students. Join us after the lecture for some drinks at The Spot.

Please RSVP to Britt Broekhaus, britt.broekhaus@wur.nl

You are all more than welcome!

With thanks and best,

on behalf of the CSPS committee (chairgroups: GEO / RSO / SDC)

Robert Fletcher

Britt Broekhaus