Designing the Quantified Self

Lezing

Designing the Quantified Self

With the rise of new technologies, it is increasingly becoming possible for us to track and scrutiny our personal behaviours, moods and performances. How is this influencing the realms of health research and design? This is one of the lectures in "The Quantified Self" series.

Organisator Studium Generale
Datum

di 30 mei 2017 20:00

Locatie Impulse, building number 115
Stippeneng 2
115
6708 WE Wageningen
+31 317-482828

With the rise of new technologies, it is increasingly becoming possible for us to track and scrutiny our personal behaviours, moods and performances. By means of ICT systems, large amounts of real-time data from the human body can be collected on a 24/7 basis. This is dramatically changing the face of health and sport related research, as the nature and intensity of the data that can be collected is unprecedented. Professor Aarnout Brombacher will discuss how this opens up intriguing opportunities to acquire more insight into the relationship between everyday activities and vitality. He will specifically focus on the way in which business process design can be applied to develop intelligent and adaptive systems that respond to the needs and wishes of users in everyday contexts. What are the ongoing and anticipated design developments and challenges in the field of the quantified self?

About Aarnout Brombacher

Aarnout Brombacher is Professor Business Process Design at the department of Industrial Design of Eindhoven University of Technology. With this chair he is responsible for research and education in the fields Quality Information Flows and Customer Perceived Quality in highly innovative product design and development processes. In the context of the quantified self, his research interests concentrate on the way in which behavioural data can be captured, modelled and used to design applications for everyday life that continuously adapt to their users.

The Quantified Self

Did you track yourself today? The emergence of new technologies makes it possible for us to become our own study object and to monitor and analyse all kinds of personal indicators: how much we move, what we eat, how we perform, etcetera. This self-tracking is referred to as the ‘quantified self’. What are the potential opportunities and risks of this emerging development? How might self-quantification affect the way we live our lives? How might it alter research practices? And how does its contribution to personal and societal objectives weigh against possible adverse consequences?