Seminar

Jessica Golberger (Washington State University):Quinoa Pioneers and the Development of Values-Based Supply Chains

This encounter is a joint seminar of the Rural Sociology group (RSO) and the Knowledge, Technology and Innovation group (KTI)

Organisator Knowledge Technology and Innovation
Datum

di 3 mei 2016 12:30 tot 13:30

Locatie Leeuwenborch, building number 201
Hollandseweg 1
201
6706 KN Wageningen
0317-483639
Zaal/kamer C070
Quinoa is a nutritious pseudocereal in high demand globally. However, the supply of quinoa from Bolivia and Peru (where over 90% of quinoa is grown) cannot meet growing global demand. In response, innovative farmers in the U.S., Europe, and Australia have been conducting quinoa variety trials, experimenting with different production practices, building processing facilities, creating farmer-owned brands, and cultivating new marketing strategies. These “quinoa pioneers” are tapping into consumers’ desires for healthy ‘superfoods’ and locally grown products. This presentation will report on innovative efforts to establish quinoa values-based supply chains in the U.S., France, England, the Netherlands, and Australia. Data come from in-person interviews with quinoa pioneers and surveys of U.S. food cooperative managers and certified organic producers. Research findings shed light on the characteristics of quinoa values-based supply chain innovators; the opportunities and challenges associated with the production, processing, and marketing of ‘local’ quinoa; and cross-cultural differences in the development of quinoa values-based supply chains.
 
Jessica Goldberger is an Associate Professor of Rural Sociology in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences at Washington State University, USA. Her interests include the sustainability of different types of agrifood practices, the diffusion of agricultural innovations, and farmer decision-making. Her current research projects focus on quinoa values-based supply chains, farmers’ use of biodegradable plastic mulch films, and the sustainability of ‘alternative’ pest management practices. More info : click here