Seeking Peace Through the Lenses of Law

Lezing

Seeking Peace Through the Lenses of Law

How do current laws influence the prospects of peace between Israelis and Palestinians and how relevant are international law, and in particular human rights relevant to a future peace?

Organisator Studium Generale
Datum

di 5 februari 2019 20:00 tot 22:00

Locatie Impulse, building number 115
Stippeneng 2
115
6708 WE Wageningen
+31 317-482828

In the summer of 2018, Israel passed the Nation-State Law. What does this law say and what are its implications for a just and peaceful future between Israelis and Palestinians? How is international law, and in particular human rights relevant to a future peace between Israel and Palestinians? Drawing on his long-time experiences in South Africa and in the region described by many as Israel-Palestine, Dr. Handmaker will reflect on peace-setting precedents elsewhere in the world, which also have experienced deep, ethno-national divisions. Explore with him the possibility of crafting a law and human rights-based solution to the longstanding impasse between Israel and the Palestinians. Handmaker is a human rights lawyer and teaches human rights, international law and social justice in The Hague at the International Institute of Social Studies (ISS) of Erasmus University Rotterdam. He is also a senior research fellow in the School of Law at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa.

About Jeff Handmaker

Jeff Handmaker teaches law, human rights, development and social justice and conducts research on legal mobilization as a tenured faculty member at the International Institute of Social Studies in The Hague, part of Erasmus University Rotterdam. In 2017, he was a visiting research fellow in the Department of Sociology at Princeton University. His long-time association with South Africa and Southern Africa is maintained as a visiting fellow in the Faculty of Law at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg and as Editor-in-Chief of the South African Journal on Human Rights. He holds various ancillary positions, including as a project board member of the Public Interest Litigation Project and regularly gives public lectures in the Netherlands, Europe and elsewhere in the world. His current research applies legal mobilization as an analytical lens to evaluate the legitimacy, capacity, structural limitations and transformative potential – including the symbolic value – for strategic legal mobilization to hold governments, individuals and corporations accountable, particularly when they are involved in serious human rights violations.

His publications include: with Karin Arts (co-editor) Mobilizing International Law for ‘Global Justice’ (Cambridge University Press, 2019); Special Issue of Global Jurist on International Law, Legitimacy and the State of Israel (October 2018) and ‘Beyond Exclusion: Assessing Palestinian Refugees’ Struggle for Protection and Recognition and their Potential Contribution to a Peace Settlement’ in pp. 197-222, K. van der Borght, K. Byttebier & C. Mackenzie (Eds.), Imagining a Shared Future: Perspectives on Law, Conflict and Economic Development in the Middle East (Cameron May, 2011)