Lezing

Twin Studies On Exercise Behaviour and Exercise Ability

Why do some people exercise more than others? Studies on exercise behaviour traditionally focused on social factors and environmental barriers. Recent studies, in which twin-research plays an important role, have broadened our horizon.

Organisator Studium Generale
Datum

di 22 september 2015 20:00 tot 22:00

Locatie Impulse, building number 115
Stippeneng 2
115
6708 WE Wageningen
+31 317-482828

The role which genes play in the heredity of complex human traits often is simplified, in the public debate. The classic distinction between ‘genes’ and ‘environment’ has lost a lot of its meaning. Or rather: the image is getting more and more nuanced.

Concerning the study of the heredity of complex human traits the twin research of the VU University is internationally leading, thanks to their extensive twin-database. How do twin-studies contribute to our understanding of heredity? And what kind of results do we get?

Why do some people exercise more than others? Studies on exercise behaviour traditionally focused on social factors and environmental barriers. For example on income and education, and on the presence or lack of sporting facilities.

Recent studies, in which twin-research plays an important role, have broadened our horizon. We know now that the influence of genetic factors is significant, and that this genetic contribution varies strongly over age.

Prof. dr. Eco de Geus (VU University Amsterdam) will elaborate on the use of twin-studies in the research on exercise behaviour and exercise ability. And he will dig into questions like: 'do all people benefit to the same extend from exercising, for example concerning body mass index?' and 'is exercise the cause of a better mental health, or is this correlation caused by other factors?'