Lezing

What can we Learn From the History of Global Inequality?

French economist Thomas Piketty has been received like a rock star in full theatres around the world; Why has his book, Capital in the Twenty-First Century struck a chord worldwide?

Organisator Studium Generale
Datum

di 14 april 2015 20:00

Locatie Impulse

Rarely is the author of a 685 page book about macroeconomics received like a rock star in full theatres around the world. French economist Thomas Piketty’s, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, has struck a chord worldwide. Why? What makes this book so important? Join Studium Generale to put Piketty’s thesis into perspective with a tour of the historical dynamics of inequality at the global level, accumulation and social stability as well as the idea of capital and the quality of life.

Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century - What can we Learn From the History of Global Inequality?

Thomas Piketty’s research provides insights into worldwide trends in accumulation and wealth. What can be said about the wider historical context which set the stage for this research? Jan Luiten van Zanden,  professor of Global Economic History at Utrecht University, will explore the long term dynamics surrounding wealth accumulated from income and inequality worldwide. He will provide insights into global trends concerning the  gap between the haves and have-nots. Find out how accumulation from income generation has influenced global wellbeing across centuries. Is global inequality rising at the moment, or are we ‘finally’ in a stage where poor countries grow more rapidly than the rich ones?

Jan Luiten van Zanden is professor of global economic history at Utrecht University, Honorary Angus Maddison Professor at Groningen University and Honorary Professor at Stellenbosch University, South Africa. He is interested in the development of global inequality in the period since 1500, and has published widely about the long term success and ‘failure’ of countries. His publications include the OECD report ‘Global Well-Being since 1820’ (2014) and An Economic History of Indonesia 1800-2010. Between Asian Drama and Growth Miracle (2012).