1. Balloons travel across great distances

1. Balloons travel across great distances

In early May 2007, a work visit of researchers of Wageningen Marine Research to French colleagues became quite embarrassing! Following Dutch Queen's Day celebrations, strong northeasterly winds brought a lot of Dutch party balloons all the way down to Normandy, at least 800km away from their point of release. In the vicinity of Le Havre, more than 10 balloons per kilometer coastline were recovered. Most originated from companies advertising their business. However, also charity organisations were involved, yet sending out the wrong message here.

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Examples of Dutch balloons, beached in Normandy following Queen's Day in the Netherlands in 2007

In the Netherlands, balloon debris from neighboring countries is also found:

These balloons found on the island of Texel, in the northwest of the Netherlands, had their origin without doubt in Belgium, where French and Dutch languages overlap. The bilingual  text ‘Dag van de Netheid / Journée Propreté’ translates to ‘Day of tidiness’. Organisers had apparently overlooked the litter problem from balloons!
These balloons found on the island of Texel, in the northwest of the Netherlands, had their origin without doubt in Belgium, where French and Dutch languages overlap. The bilingual text ‘Dag van de Netheid / Journée Propreté’ translates to ‘Day of tidiness’. Organisers had apparently overlooked the litter problem from balloons!
Also British balloons are frequently found on Texel beaches: here a balloon from the UK shoe supplier ‘Shoe Zone”.
Also British balloons are frequently found on Texel beaches: here a balloon from the UK shoe supplier ‘Shoe Zone”.