Vitamins from cassava

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Vitamins from cassava

Annually, 150 thousand children die of a vitamin A deficiency because a shortage in vitamin A makes them more susceptible to infections. Researchers at Wageningen UR are trying to combat this problem.

White cassava is the main source of nutrition in Africa. The researchers distributed yellow cassava in an impoverished part of Kenya. This cassava species is rich in beta-carotene, a substance that is converted into vitamin A by the human body. After four months, they noted that the children’s vitamin A status had significantly improved, providing evidence that vitamin A deficiencies can be addressed through food. This is how Wageningen UR contributes to improving the quality of life.

Publications

Elise Talsma
Eating yellow cassava increases vitamin A levels in the blood, it is therefore a suitable replacement for white cassava in vitamin A deficient regions where cassava is consumed.
Elise Talsma
Raw peeled yellow cassava (Photo: Elise Talsma)
Raw peeled yellow cassava (Photo: Elise Talsma)
An assortment of plants with yellow cassava (Photo: Elise Talsma)
An assortment of plants with yellow cassava (Photo: Elise Talsma)
Handing out cassava at Muusin Primary School (Photo: Menno van Zuijen)
Handing out cassava at Muusin Primary School (Photo: Menno van Zuijen)
Boiling yellow cassava (Photo: Elise Talsma)
Boiling yellow cassava (Photo: Elise Talsma)
Elise Talsma tasting the yellow cassava (Photo: Menno van Zuijen)
Elise Talsma tasting the yellow cassava (Photo: Menno van Zuijen)
Children eating yellow cassava (Photo: Elise Talsma)
Children eating yellow cassava (Photo: Elise Talsma)