New monitoring report Northern fulmars and plastics

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New monitoring report Northern Fulmars and plastics

Gepubliceerd op
21 september 2018

A new report has been published on the monitoring of plastics in stomachs of Northern Fulmars beached in the Netherlands. This indicator is used in Dutch and European policy decisions.

The report concludes that the quantity of plastics in stomachs of fulmars is somewhat decreasing. However, the rate of change is extremely slow.

The long-term target for ecological quality can only be realised if new policies are continuously developed, and if public awareness on the issue continues to grow.

The long-term policy target is that the proportion of beached fulmars with more than 0.1 gram of plastic in the stomach should be under 10%. Currently, 46% of the fulmars from the Netherlands exceeds the threshold of 0.1 gram of plastic in the stomach.

A pair of Northern Fulmars, displaying at their nest site on a cliff in the Orkney Islands.
A pair of Northern Fulmars, displaying at their nest site on a cliff in the Orkney Islands.
Plastics from the stomach of a Northern Fulmar beached in the Netherlands in 2017 (the industrial granules on the left have a diameter of 4-5 mm).
Plastics from the stomach of a Northern Fulmar beached in the Netherlands in 2017 (the industrial granules on the left have a diameter of 4-5 mm).
Plastics from the stomach of a Northern Fulmar beached in the Netherlands in 2017. The plastic ball, possibly a roller from a deodorant or glue stick, had a diameter of about 14mm and blocked passage of food through the muscular stomach of the bird.
Plastics from the stomach of a Northern Fulmar beached in the Netherlands in 2017. The plastic ball, possibly a roller from a deodorant or glue stick, had a diameter of about 14mm and blocked passage of food through the muscular stomach of the bird.
Northern Fulmar with its chick on the nest. With food provided, chicks are also fed with plastics from the stomachs of both parents.
Northern Fulmar with its chick on the nest. With food provided, chicks are also fed with plastics from the stomachs of both parents.

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