Project

Marifish

The Marifish project is subdivided in two projects, namely BADMINTON and DefineIt.

Aim

Badminton

  1. Provide estimates of amounts discarded in selected European fisheries
  2. Develop indicators of total catch, discards, and selectivity on the stock, community and fleet levels
  3. Find out the most important factors that determine discard amounts (including ecological, social and economical, and technical factors)
  4. Suggest integrated management approaches to the discard issue.

DefineIt

WP1 : The objective of WP1 is to construct multispecies models which specifically take account of prey availability and spatial overlap between predators and prey and of the technical interactions between catches of different species fishery, to use these models to develop multispecies indicators of the sustainability of fishing and to provide the model basis needed in WPs 2, 3 and 4 in order to provide an improved overall understanding of optimal ecosystem management
WP 2 : The overall aim of WP2 is to improve the understanding of processes determining variability in recruitment. Specifically, the main patterns of recruitment variability over time will be identified, and the importance of spatial structuring, variations in reproductive potential, and processes in the early life-history will be evaluated. Finally, the consequences of these processes for the provision of appropriate management advice will be assessed.
WP 3 :The objective of WP3 is to assess the effect of technical interactions in the fishing process on yield of target species as well as the effect of the fishery on non-target bycatch species
WP4 : The overall aim of WP4 is to develop resource indicators that combine economic, social and biological indicators. The traditionally used indicator of economic activity is the operating economy of the fishing fleet (landing value, profit, employment). However, such indicators neither relate directly to the benefit for the whole society nor are they necessarily sustainable. Therefore, relevant indicators for the economic return in fishing must be based on a sustainable socio-economic measure. Sustainable socio-economic return does, however, only state the present return to society of the existence of a fishery, not the economic potential of the fishery. To this aim, the Maximum Economic Yield must be determined and the socio-economic return associated with a move to the MSY and simultaneous minimisation of fishing fleet determined. To allow fisheries to conform to dynamic MSY levels, adaptive management must be planned within agreed governance structures and the rules for governance must be robust and simple to interpret. In terms of economic indicators it is furthermore important to take a stochastic approach, since variance and uncertainty are critical issues in relation to the economic performance of natural resource systems.

Approach

Badminton

  • The European Commission is preparing regulations to reduce or even maybe ban discards
  • (European Commission, 2008a). To achieve this an understanding of the extent and location of the issue is required.

DefineIt

The traditional approach to fisheries management is based on the assumption that fish stocks are isolated entities. With the development of the ecosystem approach to fisheries management, fisheries research has to broaden its approach to integrate the fact that fish are functioning within a wider ecosystem and are dependent upon complex and dynamic interactions with the ecosystem. To do so, more knowledge must be gained on the influence of ecosystem factors (e.g. environment, predator-prey relationships, …) on fish stocks. New models, integrating these factors, as well as economic factors, also need to be developed to define ecologically and economically sustainable levels of exploitation.

Results

Badminton

  • M1. Report on an overview of existing discard data by métier/fleet, area and member state
  • M2. Tool for description of spatial and temporal discarding patterns, comprising of a statistical framework in an open-source software program
  • M3. Workshop to use this tool and perform a common analysis of spatial and temporal discarding patterns
  • M4. Collation of relevant biological and technical information to estimate indicators in each study area
  • M5. Common protocol for developing state and pressure indicators
  • M6.  Provision of a general framework to evaluate technical measures
  • M7. Collation of catch data with corresponding information on gear type, area, season environmental factors, year-class strength and legislation
  • M8. Development of methods for evaluating specific technical measures using catch and associated data
  • M9. Framework for understanding drivers for the selective and discard behaviour
  • M10. First case study finalised – and the framework evaluated based on the preliminary case study experiences
  • M11. Specification of drivers and incentives in the selected fisheries and a description of how they influence the general discard behaviour and uptake of selective gear
  • M12. Simulation tool to predict optimal mesh and the effect of technical measure
  • M13. Workshop to discuss the consequences of findings in the other WPs in terms of discard management
  • M14. Final Report

DefineIt

1.1.1 Report on including alternative prey in multispecies models
1.1.2 Report on including predator-prey spatial distribution in multispecies models
1.1.3 Report on including technical interactions in multispecies models
1.2.1 Report on multispecies models in the Aegean Sea
1.3.1 Report on the differences between single species models and multispecies models on the perception of historical stock dynamics
1.3.2 Report on the differences between new and current multispecies models on the perception of historical stock dynamics
1.4.1 Report on the definition of multispecies indicators
1.4.2 Report on methods to estimate multispecies limit and target reference points
2.1.1 Report describing the main causes of variation in recruitment patterns between stocks
2.2.1 Report describing the population sub-structure of herring and/or cod in the North Sea
2.2.2 Relationship(s) quantifying the contribution of population sub-structure to recruitment variability
2.3.1 Report describing the variability of stock reproductive potential (SRP) and investigating the factors explaining this variability.
2.3.2 Relationship(s) encapsulating the contribution of stock reproductive potential to recruitment variability
2.4.1 Manuscript(s) identifying the relative contribution of physical and biological processes in the survival of early life-stages.
2.4.2 Manuscript identifying the relative contribution of functional genomic variation, environmental conditions experienced and physiological trait variation during early life history stages
2.4.3 Relationship quantifying the contribution of the environmental and biological environment to recruitment variability
2.5.1. Report on the difference between reference points based on improved stock reproductive potential (SRP) indices and conventional reference points
2.5.2 Report describing the outcome of management strategy evaluations examining the effect of population sub-structure, variability reproductive potential and environmental variability upon exploitation of fish stocks
2.5.3 Multispecies simulation models with realistic recruitment variability incorporated
2.6.1 Report on including improved stock recruitment relationships in multispecies prediction models
2.6.2 Report on multispecies Schaeffer models fitted to the output of the different multispecies models
3.1.1. Report on the effect on yield of bycatch due to technical interactions
3.1.2 Report on the effect on economic yield of bycatch and subsequent discard due to technical interactions
3.2.1 Report defining sensitive species
3.2.2 Report defining habitat areas and distribution of sensitive species and the overlap with fishing effort distribution in order to estimate susceptibility
3.2.3. Report on effort limits necessary to assure sustainable populations of non-target fish species
3.3.1 Explore the use of size based models in management of sensitive fish species in order to identify appropriate indicators
3.4.1. Report on the evaluation of a range of fisheries and metiers against Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) criteria 3.4.2. Report on the illustration of the trade off between the effects of fishing on non-target fish species, yield etc. 4.1.2 Report on the effect of effort on annual user value
4.1.3 Report on the effect of including limits to bycatch mortality on maximum sustainable economic yield.
4.2.1 Report identifying options and implications for responsive management systems based on economic indicators
4.3.1 Report identifying appropriate economic indicators for practical responsive management systems
4.4.1 Report demonstrating the effects of using such economic indicators within practical responsive management systems
5.1.1. Report on the predictions of ecosystem dynamics under selected climatic scenarios
5.1.2. Report on the changes in proposed indicators under changing climatic conditions
5.1.3. Report on the maximum economic yield under selected climatic scenarios
5.2.1 Report describing general properties of the dynamics of interacting fish stocks
5.3.1. Manuscripts for publication in peer reviewed scientific journals produced within WP1 to WP4
5.3.2 Presentation of project results in relevant ICES, GFCM and ICCAT working groups
5.3.3 Presentation of project results at stakeholder seminars
5.3.4 Presentation of project results at project web site
6.1.1. Report on the kick-off meeting
6.1.2 Project web site
6.1.3 Project meeting reports

6.2.1 Mid term report