Convention on Biological Diversity

Convention on Biological Diversity

'Marine debris represents a significant additional and escalating anthropogenic factor affecting marine habitats and biodiversity.'That is the conclusion in recent report by the secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

Knowledge derived from the North Sea Fulmar study is incorporated in this new report (eg graph on p. 18). CBD-GEF (Global Environment Facility) will address marine debris problems in November 2013.

Impacts of Marine Debris on Biodiversity: Current Status and Potential Solutions

Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Scientific and Technical Advisory Panel—GEF (2012).






(A) Fulmars are known to ingest plastic debris. (B) Example of plastic debris from the stomach of a dead fulmar, 95% of which have some plastic in their stomachs. (C) A target Environmental Quality Objective (EcoQO) that <2% of dead birds should have < 0.1g of plastics in their stomachs has been proposed (top right). However, this target is far from being realised. Map shows regionaltrends, 2002 -2004, for the percentage of birds that had more than 0.1g of plastic in their stomachs. Courtesy of J. A. van Franeker
(A) Fulmars are known to ingest plastic debris. (B) Example of plastic debris from the stomach of a dead fulmar, 95% of which have some plastic in their stomachs. (C) A target Environmental Quality Objective (EcoQO) that <2% of dead birds should have < 0.1g of plastics in their stomachs has been proposed (top right). However, this target is far from being realised. Map shows regionaltrends, 2002 -2004, for the percentage of birds that had more than 0.1g of plastic in their stomachs. Courtesy of J. A. van Franeker