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Course NEM-20806 Basics of Infectious Diseases

Gepubliceerd op
28 september 2010

Students collecting soil samples and earthworms at a biological chicken farm.

Pictures of parasitic nematodes in chicken found by students

Here a selection of photo’s are shown of parasitic nematodes that were found in the digestive system of chicken.

Most pronounced morphological characteristics of these nematodes include body length, male and female reproductive organs and there position. Besides, the organ or part of the chicken’s digestive system in which the nematodes are found can be indicative for which nematode species was found.

Ultimate proof on species level can be obtained by sequencing the 18S Short SubUnit (SSU) of the nematode’s ribosomal DNA, or digestion pattern of this DNA fragment with discriminating restriction enzymes.



Male Heterakis: Posterior part which shows the male reproductive organ: the spicula, there are two sticking out the body and typically  differ in their length. Furthermore, a preanel sucker is present.
Male Heterakis: Posterior part which shows the male reproductive organ: the spicula, there are two sticking out the body and typically differ in their length. Furthermore, a preanel sucker is present.
Eggs of Heterakis species, leave the chicken through feaces and can remain infective in the soil for several months in the soil.
Eggs of Heterakis species, leave the chicken through feaces and can remain infective in the soil for several months in the soil.
Capilaria spp. :  part of intestine.
Capilaria spp. : part of intestine.
Capilaria spp.:  Anterior part of Capilaria species.
Capilaria spp.: Anterior part of Capilaria species.
Ascaridia spp.:  Anterior part: head of nematode
Ascaridia spp.: Anterior part: head of nematode
Ascaridia spp.:  tail of nematode
Ascaridia spp.: tail of nematode
Students involved in the diagnosis of infectious diseases in chickens
Students involved in the diagnosis of infectious diseases in chickens
Intestinal worms found in free-range biological chickens
Intestinal worms found in free-range biological chickens
Pictures by: Hein Overmars and Geert Smant