Studentenverhaal

Benard Nsubuga on his internship at the Geography Institute University of Bonn (GIUB), Germany

Benard Nsubuga did his internship at the Geography Institute University of Bonn (GIUB), Germany in 2017.

Self-confidence was central to acquiring new and incredibly exciting skills and experiences
Benard Nsubuga

I carried out my internship training at the Remote Sensing Research Group (RSRG), which is a research group under the Geography Institute University of Bonn (GIUB), Germany. This group is closely linked with the Center for Remote Sensing of Land Surfaces (ZFL), which also has roots from the RSRG and part of GIUB. The group’s focus is on applied remote sensing with projects across different continents, such as Africa, Europe, and Asia. Specifically, its projects focus on the themes of 1) Monitoring and modeling of land use and cover change, 2) Land degradation, 3) Food security, 4) Monitoring and mapping of wetlands, and 5) Didactics of remote sensing. For more detailed information on the research topics within the group, refer to the group website.

My internship focused on the application of remote sensing tools and data in the development of land cover/land use maps to be utilized in time series change analysis and detection. Therefore, I primarily concentrated on the development of high spatial-resolution land cover maps for Wakiso District and surrounding areas in Uganda, for 2000 and 2016, using multispectral satellite datasets (Landsat 7 ETM+ Sentinel-2). Wakiso district is one of the study sites of the GlobE wetlands in East Africa project (Namulonge site). Therefore, the outputs of my internship research were inputs to the hydrological modeling and wetland future status quo determination and monitoring under the theme of assessing the potential of East African wetlands becoming a food basket for the society.

Self-confidence was central to acquiring new and incredibly exciting skills and experiences in applied GIS and remote sensing, relevant to my future career as a climate and environmental change researcher. Therefore, the internship period at the RSRG to which I was committed for four months, was a success to both me and the involved projects. This was in form of my achievement of the intended learning objectives as well as the project’s aimed products. Whereby I acquire expertise and experience within an international working environment of expert researchers in the field applied GIS and remote sensing to environmental change monitoring. I thereby recommend future students who would like to gain hands on experience in the application of GIS and remote sensing to consider the option of joining this friendly, experienced and flexible research group. This is possible through contacting the individual researchers from the group website hereby listed in this highlight.