Sharing your research results

Collaboration is important in research and being able to share and disseminate your research results is essential.

Sharing has never been so easy: there are many platforms available to share your publications in just a few clicks, such as  ResearchGate, Academia.edu, ScholarMate, Mendeley, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and so much more. Before you hit the share button, make sure you have taken copyright into consideration.

Can I publish a PDH of my paper on ResearchGate, Academia.edu or ScholarMate?

You may always share a link to your research output on platforms like ResearchGate, Academia.edu, or ScholarMate. However, you may share a PDF of your research output only if you are the work’s copyright owner and the work is not limited by contractual agreements (e.g. regarding confidentiality), if you have the owner’s permission, or if a statutory exemption applies (e.g. for personal use or in accordance with the Taverne amendment). In most cases, however, copyright of research papers, reports or books is transferred to the publisher. Therefore, you should check if the publisher’s conditions allow to share your paper or other research output on ResearchGate, Academia.edu or ScholarMate. These conditions might be written down in the Author Rights document. In many cases, publishers allow sharing your paper’s post-print or pre-print version, sometimes after an embargo. On the SHERPA/RoMEO website, you can check if you may share versions of your research paper.

You may also not be allowed to personally share your paper with a colleague by e-mail. If someone requests a PDF of your paper, please verify that you are entitled to do so, or otherwise send the link to your paper on the publisher’s website.

May I share research publications through Mendeley?

The general rule is that only the copyright owner has the right to express, publish, display, distribute and copy his or her work. As long as you are the copyright owner, you may share your publications through Mendeley. However, if your paper is published in a journal, you most likely transferred the copyright to the publisher. You should therefore check if the publisher’s conditions allow sharing your papers through Mendeley. On the SHERPA/RoMEO website, you can check if you may share versions of your paper.

May I share research publications through social media?

You may always share a link to your research output on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or other social media. However, you may share a PDF of your research only if you are the work’s copyright owner and the work is not limited by contractual agreements (e.g. regarding confidentiality), if you have the owner’s permission, or if a statutory exemption applies(e.g. for personal use or in accordance with the Taverne amendment). In most cases, however, copyright of research papers, reports or books is transferred to the publisher and therefore you should check if the publisher’s conditions in the Journal Author Rights allow sharing your paper or other research results on social media. On the SHERPA/RoMEO website, you can check if you may share versions of your research paper through social media.

May I share research output on my personal website?

You may always share a link to your research output on your personal website. However, you may share a PDF of your research output only if you are the work’s copyright owner and the work is not limited by contractual agreements (e.g. regarding confidentiality), if you have the owner’s permission, or if a statutory exemption applies (e.g. for personal use or in accordance with the Taverne amendment). In most cases, however, copyright of research papers, reports or books are transferred to the publisher and therefore you should check if the publisher’s conditions in the Journal Author Rights allow sharing your paper or other research results on social media. On the SHERPA/RoMEO website, you can check if you may share versions of your research paper on your personal website.

May I share research output in a repository?

The general rule is that only the copyright owner has the right to express, publish, display, distribute and copy his or her work. As long as you are the copyright owner, you may share your publications in a repository like Research@wur, or platforms like Shareyourpaper.org. However, if your paper is published in a journal, you most likely transferred the copyright to the publisher and therefore you should check if the publisher’s conditions allow sharing your papers or other copyrighted material in a repository. On the SHERPA/RoMEO website, you can check if you may share your papers in a repository.

May I share my author's pre-print on a pre-print service?

The general rule is that only the copyright owner has the right to express, publish, display, distribute and copy his or her work. As long as you are the copyright owner, you may share your publications through a pre-print service. However, if your paper is published in a journal, you most likely transferred the copyright to the publisher. You should therefore check if the publisher’s conditions in the Journal Author Rights allow sharing your papers through a pre-print service. On the SHERPA/RoMEO website, you can also check if you may share your author’s pre-print through a pre-print service. In some cases you may for example only share your pre-print through non-commercial pre-print services.

May I share conference talks or educational material?

WUR owns the copyright on all conference presentations created by its employees. Only WUR has the exclusive right to reproduce the work, to make the work publicly available or to put a CC-license on the work.  

WUR owns the copyright on educational materials created by its employees. Copyright on educational materials, such as lecture materials, PowerPoint slide shows, video recordings of lectures, course guides and other educational materials are vested solely in WUR. In short, only WUR has the exclusive right to reproduce the work or to make the work publicly available. For more information see the page Ownership & Licenses.

Do I need to consider copyright law when sharing the dataset of my MSc thesis?

If applicable, WUR students own the copyright of a dataset that they created during the MSc thesis project. However, most data are factual, and factual data have no copyright protection. In many cases, WUR or another organisation provide a dataset to the student. In this situation, the data could be/are owned by WUR and/or another organisation. If the data has restricted use, (e.g. the data cannot be used by another university or shared with others), these restrictions should be stated in the thesis agreement and the agreement should be signed by the student. WUR has developed policies about publishing and sharing data. On the WDCC Data Management website, you find more information about Research Data Management and how to publish a dataset.    

After publishing my PhD thesis, may I publish a chapter as a journal article?

If you submit manuscripts (chapters of your PhD-thesis) to a journal after your thesis has been submitted and made publicly available through Wageningen University & Research PhD theses, you may receive an e-mail from the publisher that your manuscript cannot be accepted because of plagiarism. To prevent this, you need to place an embargo on your thesis. Please email media.library@wur.nl to request an embargo before you submit your thesis. During the 1-year embargo, your thesis will not be available online and will not appear in plagiarism-detection software. You may also extend the embargo if needed.

After publishing a journal article, may I include this article in my PhD thesis?

During the paper submission process, you may be asked to transfer your copyright to the publisher. If you must transfer all your rights, it is important to retain the right to publish this article as a chapter in your PhD thesis or the right to use this article in education. If you did not arrange this with the journal during the paper submission process, it will depend on the journal if you are allowed to publish the article as a thesis chapter. Please check the publisher’s copyright statement or the contract you have signed if you may publish the paper in your thesis.

In some cases, you may publish the paper’s post print or pre-print version in your thesis. On the SHERPA/RoMEO website, you can check if you may publish the paper in your PhD thesis.

What should I do when someone asks permission to use my research output?

WUR authors may be asked for permission to use their publications. The requestor may be the Copyright Clearance Center or another organisation or individual. If you receive a request, please contact the legal officers of your Science Group.

Last updated on 15/04/2020.