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Corrigendum to: “Comparison of bovine milk fat and vegetable fat for infant formula: Implications for infant health”

Hageman, Jeske H.J.; Danielsen, Marianne; Nieuwenhuizen, Arie G.; Feitsma, Anouk L.; Dalsgaard, Trine K.

Summary

The authors regret that the cholesterol levels in current infant formulas quoted from Claumarchirant et al. (2015) on page 41, and additional calculations, were reported incorrectly. The average concentration of cholesterol in infant formulas based on vegetable fats should be 17.3 mg L−1, ranging from 14.6 to 22.2 mg L−1 (IFs 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 11, 12, and 13 from Table 2 of Claumarchirant et al., 2015). The average concentration of cholesterol in infant formulas containing a fat blend of vegetable fats and bovine milk lipids should be 36.9 mg L−1, ranging from 20.3 to 51.0 mg L−1 (IFs 1, 5, 6, 9, and 10 from Table 2 of Claumarchirant et al., 2015). This has no consequences for the conclusions of the manuscript. Page 41 should read: “A recent study investigating sterol content of IFs showed that those based on vegetable fats contained, on average, 17.3 mg L−1 of cholesterol (Claumarchirant, Matencio, Sanchez-Siles, Alegría, & Lagarda, 2015). In line with the findings on phospholipids, the cholesterol present in IFs based on vegetable fats also mostly originates from the small amount of milk fat present in skimmed milk (Berger et al., 2000). Newer types of IF, containing a blend of vegetable fats and bovine milk fat, contain higher levels of cholesterol, on average 36.9 mg L−1 (Claumarchirant et al., 2015). Calculations based on literature values (NEVO online; RIVM, 2016) indicate that by replacing every 10% of vegetable fat by bovine milk fat in a fat blend for infant formula, about 10 mg L−1 of cholesterol could be added. The authors would like to apologise for any inconvenience caused.